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October 2, 2002

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Volkswagen Touareg - Start of a new off-road vehicle philosophy

Photo: VW

  • Touareg unites the best of the street and off-road worlds without compromise

  • Touareg V10 TDI comes standard with CDC air suspension and Keyless Access

Volkswagen is introducing the new Touareg luxury off-road vehicle to the German market this autumn. Both visually and technically, the Touareg represents a vehicle concept which blazes new trails at the high end of the SUV (Sport Utility Vehicle) market. Unlike the familiar vehicles of this segment, it combines the features of a high-quality off-road vehicle with the comfort of a luxury sedan and dynamic of a sports car in a new vehicle philosophy.

The Touareg's introduction to the market is starting with a 3.2-litre V6 petrol engine and a 5-litre V10 TDI.

The V6 engine achieves 162 kW / 220 hp and develops up to 305 Nm torque. One of the world's most fascinating diesel engines is available with the new V10 TDI; the 230 kW / 313 hp biturbo engine generates in impressive 750 Nm of torque at just 2000 rpm. Two additional engines will follow: a 2.5-litre, 5-cylinder TDI and a 4.2-litre V8 petrol engine.

4XMOTION four-wheel drive with central differential lock as standard

The Touareg's gears are shifted with a six-speed gearbox, either manual or redesigned automatic depending on the engine.

Power flows to the continuous 4XMOTION four-wheel drive via a transfer gearbox - whose standard features include switchable off-road reduction - and a front-axle, rear-axle and central differential. All Touaregs come standard with central differential lock and offer rear-axle differential lock as an option. The running-gear electronic system automatically triggers the multi-disc clutch of the central differential lock and rear-axle differential. In normal, even drive and road conditions, the power distribution is 50:50. But depending on the driving situation, up to 100% of the drive force can be transferred to one of the two axles. The driver can also activate the locks (up to 100%) manually using a rotary switch in the cockpit. An electronic differential lock (EDL) acting on all four wheels supports the fine distribution of the drive force.

(Sept. 30, 2002)


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